Renewable Energy in Pakistan: 15.2% of Households Use Solar

Solar panel installations in Pakistani homes are rising rapidly. Pakistan PSLM/HIES 2018-19 survey results reveal that 15.2% of all households are using solar panels as a source of energy for their homes.  Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province leads the nation with 40% of all households using solar energy. Rural Pakistan is embracing solar power at a faster rate than Urban Pakistan. Adoption of solar in rural areas of KP is at 43%, Sindh 33.9%,  Balochistan 20.4% and Punjab 7.9%. Rapid decline in cost of solar panels appears to be driving the adoption of solar in Pakistan's rural areas where grid power is either unavailable or unreliable. Pakistan is starting to join the clean energy revolution with increasing adoption of solar and recent announcement of National Electric Vehicle Policy. Covid19 pandemic may temporarily slow it down but the upward trend will likely continue.
Pakistan Solar Panel Imports in Millions of US Dollars. Source: FBS Via Pakistan Today

Solar Panels in Pakistan: 

Imports of solar panels have increased at 15.9% annually in US dollar terms and 22.6% in Pakistan rupee terms in the last years. Solar panel imports have jumped from just $1 million in 2004 to a peak of $772 million in the fiscal year ending June 30, 2017, then declined to  $343 million in 2018 and then rose again to $409 million in 2019.  Covid19 pandemic may temporarily slow it down but the upward trend will likely continue.
Households Using Solar Panels. Source: PSLM/HIES 2018-19 Via Bilal Gilani of Gallup
Solar panel installations in Pakistani homes are rising rapidly. Pakistan PSLM/HIES 2018-19 survey results reveal that 15.2% of all households are using solar panels as source of energy for their homes. 

Government survey data shows that 20% of rural households are  using solar panels, significantly ahead of just 7.7% urban households in the country. Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province leads with 40% of households using solar energy, followed by Balochistan 25.7%, Sindh 20.5% and Punjab 6.4%.

Rural Pakistan is leading the nation into wider use of solar power.  Adoption of solar in rural areas of KP is at 43%, Sindh 33.9%,  Balochistan 20.4% and Punjab 7.9%. Rapid decline in cost of solar panels appears to be driving adoption of the solar energy in Pakistan's rural areas where grid power is either unavailable or unreliable.

Pakistan Electric Vehicle Policy:

Pakistan has a low level of motorization with just 9% of the households owning a car. Nearly half of all households own a motorcycle. Motorization rates in the country have tripled over the last decade and a half, resulting in nearly 40% of all emissions coming from vehicles. Concerns about climate change and environmental pollution have forced the government to to take a number of actions ranging from adoption of Euro6 emission standards for new vehicles with internal combustion engines (ICE) since 2015 and announcement of a national electric vehicle (EV) policy this year.

Private vehicle ownership in Pakistan has risen sharply over the last 4 years. More than 9% of households now own cars, up from 6% in 2015. Motorcycle ownership has jumped from 41% of households in 2015 to 53% now, according to data released by Federal Bureau of Statistics (FBS) recently. There are 32.2 million households in Pakistan, according to 2017 Census.


Vehicle Ownership in Pakistan. Source: PBS

Pakistan's National EV Policy is a forward looking step needed to deal with climate concerns from growing transport sector emissions with rapidly rising vehicle ownership. It offers tax incentives for buyers and sellers. It also focuses on development of nationwide charging infrastructure to ease adoption of electric vehicles.

Low Carbon Energy Growth:

In recent years,  Pakistan government has introduced a number of supportive policies, including feed-in tariffs and a net metering program to incentivize renewables. These have been fairly successful, and renewables capacity in the country surged substantially over 2018 when 1245 MW was added, of which 826MW was contributed by the solar sector, according to Fitch Solutions.

Non-Hydro Renewables in Pakistan. Source: Fitch Solutions

Pakistan’s Alternative Energy Development Board (AEDB) recently signed deals for projects that will see the country expand its wind power capacity by 560 MW.  Fitch Solutions forecasts Pakistan's solar capacity to grow by an annual average of 9.4% between 2019-2028, taking total capacity over 3.8GW by the end of our forecast period.

Sindh government has recently signed a deal for 400MW solar park at Manjhand, 20MW rooftop solar systems on public sector buildings in Karachi and Hyderabad, and 200,000 solar home systems for remote areas in 10 districts of the province. The project is estimated to cost USD105million, with the World Bank funding USD100 million.

The biggest and most important source of low-carbon energy in Pakistan is its hydroelectric power plants. Pakistan ranked third in the world by adding nearly 2,500 MW of hydropower in 2018, according to Hydropower Status Report 2019.  China added the most capacity with the installation of 8,540 megawatts, followed by Brazil (3,866 MW), Pakistan (2,487 MW), Turkey (1,085 MW), Angola (668 MW), Tajikistan (605 MW), Ecuador (556 MW), India (535 MW), Norway (419 MW) and Canada (401 MW).

New Installed Hydroelectric Power Capacity in 2018. Source: Hydroworld.com

Hydropower now makes up about 28% of the total installed capacity of 33,836 MW as of February, 2019.   WAPDA reports contributing 25.63 billion units of hydroelectricity to the national grid during the year, “despite the fact that water flows in 2018 remained historically low.” This contribution “greatly helped the country in meeting electricity needs and lowering the electricity tariff for the consumers.”

Chinese BYD in Pakistan:

Multiple media reports suggest that China's BYD is about to enter Pakistan market following the announcement of Pakistan National EV Policy.   These reports indicate that Toyota, one of the largest automakers in Pakistan, has signed a deal with BYD to manufacture electric vehicles.

Other reports indicate that Pakistan's Rahmat Group is in talks with BYD to set up an electric vehicle plant at Nooriabad in Sindh province.

Minister for Science and Technology Fawad Chaudhry has claimed that in three years Pakistan will become the first country to manufacture electric buses, which will be driven by an electric motor and obtains energy from on-board batteries.

Summary: 

Pakistan is starting to join the clean energy revolution with increasing adoption of solar and recent announcement of National Electric Vehicle Policy.  Solar panel installations in Pakistani homes are rising rapidly. Pakistan PSLM/HIES 2018-19 survey results reveal that 15.2% of all households are using solar panels as source of energy for their homes.  The country has set targets for renewable energy growth and announced National Electric Vehicle Policy.  In recent years,  Pakistan government has introduced a number of supportive policies, including feed-in tariffs and a net metering program to incentivize renewables. These have been fairly successful, and renewables capacity in the country surged substantially over 2018 when 1245 MW was added, of which 826MW was contributed by the solar sector, according to Fitch Solutions.  High-capacity battery pack costs have dropped nearly 40% since 2015, according to Wood Mackenzie data as reported by Wall Street Journal.  Cost reductions are expected to continue to only $8 to $14 per MW-hour by 2020, or about a penny per kW-hour. While production and use of renewable energy are growing, the electric vehicles in Pakistan have yet to find traction. Hopefully, the National EV policy will encourage production and adoption of electric vehicles in the country.  Covid19 pandemic may temporarily slow it down but the upward trend will likely continue.

Related Links:

Haq's Musings

South Asia Investor Review

Clean Energy Revolution in Pakistan

Pakistan Electric Vehicle Policy

Nuclear Power in Pakistan

Recurring Cycles of Drought and Floods in Pakistan

Pakistan's Response to Climate Change

Massive Oil and Gas Discovery in Pakistan: Hype vs Reality

Renewable Energy for Pakistan

Digital BRI: China and Pakistan Building Fiber, 5G Networks

LNG Imports in Pakistan

Growing Water Scarcity in Pakistan

China-Pakistan Economic Corridor

Ownership of Appliances and Vehicles in Pakistan

CPEC Transforming Pakistan

Pakistan's $20 Billion Tourism Industry Boom

Riaz Haq's YouTube Channel

PakAlumni Social Network

Comments

Riaz Haq said…
#Pakistan awards $5.8B contract for #dam construction to consortium of #Chinese and #Pakistani companies. #diamerbhashadam will store 6.4 million acre feet (MAF) of #water and produce 4,500 MW of clean #electricity.$1.03B for social programs around the dam http://v.aa.com.tr/1839628

Islamabad on Wednesday granted a contract worth 442 billion Pakistani rupees ($5.85 billion) to a consortium of Chinese and Pakistani companies for construction of a major dam to cope with the country's growing energy requirements.

The contract was signed at a ceremony in the capital Islamabad between the Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), and a joint venture of Power China, and Frontier Works Organization – a subsidiary of Pakistan’s Army – for construction of a diversion system, main dam, and access bridge of Diamer-Basha dam, apart from a 21 megawatt hydropower project.

Amir Bashir Chaudhry, chief executive officer of the project, and Yang Jiandu of Power China signed the agreement on behalf of WAPDA and the joint venture respectively, according to a statement by the Water and Power Ministry.

WAPDA has already awarded a consultancy contract of the project to Diamer Basha Consultants Group (DBCG) worth 27.182 billion rupees ($168.8 million). The consultancy agreement includes construction design, construction supervision, and contract administration of the Diamer-Basha Dam project, the statement added.

The development came a day after Prime Minister Imran Khan announced the start of construction of the much-awaited dam in northern Pakistan.

The $14 billion dam, to be constructed on the River Indus in the northern Gilgit-Baltistan region, which borders China, is set to produce 4500MW of affordable electricity, said the statement.

"The 6.4 MAF [million acre foot] water storage capacity of the dam will reduce the current water shortage in the country of 12 MAF to 6.1 MAF," the statement said, adding that it will also add 35 years to the life of Tarbela Dam – one of the two major dams in Pakistan – by reducing sedimentation.

Some 78.5 billion rupees ($1.03 billion) will be spent on social development of the area around the dam, mainly on resettlement of the population.

"It will also be a major source of flood mitigation and save billions worth of damages caused by floods each year," the statement said.

Earlier, Asim Saleem Bajwa, special assistant to the prime minister on information, called the announcement "historic."

"Announcing to start construction of Diamer Bhasha dam today is a historic news for all generations of Pakistan, a huge stimulus for our economy, create 16,500 jobs, generate 4500 MW hydel power, and irrigate 1.2 million acre agriculture land," he tweeted on Monday.

Riaz Haq said…
"What is the solar panel cost / maintenance of running a two bedroom apartment in Pakistan with fans and lights in each room, couple of computers, TV and a Refrigerator?

About Rs 106,000 for 540W system:

Solar Panel: Rs. 100 per watt = Rs. 100 x 540 = Rs. 54,000
Inverter – we will need 1KW inverter = Rs. 26,000
Batteries: 2 x 200 Amp batteries: Rs. 13,000 x 2 = Rs. 26,000
Total Cost: Rs. 54,000 + Rs. 26,000 + Rs. 26,000 = Rs. 106,000 https://www.phoneworld.com.pk/energy-efficient-and-a-better-investment/
Riaz Haq said…
#China ignores #India over world's highest Diamer-Bhasha #dam project in #Pakistani #Kashmir. #Islamabad gets #Beijing funds for joint venture opposed by #Delhi. It will generate 4,500 MW of #power & store 8 million acre-feet of #water. #RenewableEnergy

http://www.southasianwire.com/news/2020/05/24/china-ignores-india-over-dam-project-in-pakistani-kashmir/

In a pierce that has severely dissatisfied India and tightened ecomomic family with China, Pakistan has awarded a agreement to a Chinese-Pakistani corner try to build a dam in a long-disputed Kashmir region.

The initial proviso of a Diamer Bhasha dam project, value 442 billion Pakistan rupees ($2.75 billion), has been awarded to a joint venture between Power Construction Corporation of China and a Pakistan Army’s Frontier Works Organization on a 70:30 basis.

The devise is located in Gilgit-Baltistan, a primeval segment 320km from a limit with China. The multipurpose dam will be used for appetite generation, H2O storage and inundate control. It will have a 4,500 megawatt ability and storage for 8.1 million hactare feet of water.

The dam is China’s initial vital infrastructure devise in Kashmir, and partial of a China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), that is tied into China’s vast Belt and Road Initiative.

In 2018, China commissioned an 820km fiber ocular wire underneath CPEC that cost $37.4 million and upheld by a same region.

Muzammil Hussain, authority of Pakistan’s Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), pronounced his classification will yield 30% of a investment and a supervision of Pakistan a rest. Hussain put a sum cost of a devise during 1.497 trillion rupees ($8.77 billion).

The figure is contentious, however, given Hussain formerly estimated a cost during about $14 billion on several occasions.

Pakistan is positively in a financial break and would be incompetent to self-finance a project. Only final week, a supervision diverted $6.23 million from a COVID-19 service account to compensate seductiveness on appetite debts.

James M. Dorsey, a comparison associate during Singapore’s S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS), believes that China will account a devise by loans to Pakistan, though how these will be repaid stays to be seen. Dorsey told a Nikkei Asian Review that a devise will offer China’s interests some-more than Pakistan’s since “China has a top palm in negotiate due to a mercantile support to Pakistan underneath [CPEC].”

Some observers trust Pakistan is penetrating to get a dam built fast and peaceful to leave financing concerns until later. “There’s no denote that Islamabad has suspicion by how it will cover these measureless costs,” Michael Kugelman, emissary executive of a Asia module during a Wilson Center in Washington D.C., told Nikkei. “Or if it has suspicion things through, it hasn’t expelled a devise to a public.”

“Since [Islamabad] will have few other funder options, it won’t have most precedence with China in terms of a structuring of a intensity loan,” Kugelman said.

In Nov 2017, Pakistan pulled a dam proposal out of CPEC since of Beijing’s conditions, that enclosed owning a project. Islamabad’s progressing requests to other appropriation sources, including a World Bank and a Asian Development Bank in 2016, were incited down since of a longstanding feeling between India and Pakistan over Kashmir.

India immediately cursed a latest development. “We have consistently conveyed a criticism and common concerns with both China and Pakistan on all such projects in a Indian territories underneath Pakistan’s bootleg occupation,” Shri Anurag Srivastava, a central orator of India’s Ministry of External Affairs pronounced in a statement.

Beijing discharged a Indian protest. Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Lijian Zhao described a dam as jointly profitable with win-win potential. “China’s position on a emanate of Kashmir is consistent,” pronounced Zhao.”China and Pakistan control mercantile team-work to foster mercantile growth and urge a contentment of a internal people.”

Riaz Haq said…
#Pakistan's Suki Kinari #hydroelectric power project unaffected by #COVID19. 19.5% work on the 874 MW dam project completed on Kunhar River with an investment of
US $ 1.963 billion under the umbrella of #CPEC. #China #renewableenergy https://www.app.com.pk/progress-of-suki-kinari-power-project-remains-unaffected-during-covid-19-asim-bajwa/ via @appcsocialmedia

Special Assistant to Prime Minister on Information and Broadcasting General (retd) Asim Saleem Bajwa Wednesday said work on the Suki Kinari hydal power project was in full swing as progress on the project remained unaffected due to COVID-19.
In a tweet, Asim Bajwa who is also Chairman, China Pakistan Economic Corridor Authority (CPECA) said, 19.5 percent work on the 874 MW power project had been completed.
He said the project was being established at Kunhar River with an investment of
US $ 1.963 bn under the umbrella of China Pakistan Economic Corridor.
He informed that the project had so far created 4,250 job opportunities and
after completion it would help reducing cost of electricity.
“Bringing cost of electricity down is top priority of the government,” he added.
Riaz Haq said…
#WorldBank approves US $700m for 4,320 MW Dasu #hydropower project in #Pakistan. Loan will be used to build transmission line and complete the 2,160MW first phase of the plant. Total project cost: cost US $4.2 billion.
https://constructionreviewonline.com/2020/04/world-bank-approves-us-700m-for-4-32gw-dasu-hydropower-project-in-pakistan/ via @Construction Review Online

The World Bank has approved US $700m grant to finance the construction of the 32GW Dasu hydropower project in Pakistan. The hydroelectric power plant which is being built on the Indus River, approximately 7km upstream of the Dasu town, Kohistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa; is being implemented by Pakistan’s Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA).

The World Bank’s additional financing will be used to construct the transmission line and complete the 2,160MW first phase of the plant. The entire project is estimated to cost US $4.2bn.

Upon completion, the Dasu hydropower plant will become the largest of its kind in the country, generating low-cost, renewable energy to power millions of users. The hydropower plant is expected to come online in 2023.

World Bank Pakistan country director Illango Patchamuthu said that Pakistan’s energy sector is aiming to move away from high-cost and inefficient fossil fuels towards low-cost, renewable energy to power the national grid. “Along with reforms in the tariff structure, the Dasu Hydropower Project will result in fewer imports of fossil fuels, alleviating the stress on the country’s current account balance,” he said.

In addition to providing most of the clean electricity during the summer months, the Dasu hydropower plant is expected to contribute to the socioeconomic development in Dasu and surrounding areas of the Upper Kohistan District of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province.

Furthermore, World Bank Task Team Leader Rikard Liden added that the Dasu hydropower plant has a low environmental footprint and is considered to be one of the best hydropower projects in the world. “It will contribute to reducing Pakistan’s reliance on fossil- fuels and producing clean renewable energy,” he affirmed.
Riaz Haq said…
#China's Goldwind books 50-MW #WindEnergy turbines order in Jhimpir, #Sindh, #Pakistan in an area identified as a “wind corridor” with 1000 MW of wind power capacity installed. Golwind expects to install 150 MW of turbines in Pak in coming years #renewable https://www.renewablesnow.com/news/goldwind-books-50-mw-turbine-order-in-pakistan-701129/

China’s Xinjiang Goldwind Science & Technology Co Ltd (HKG:2208) said it has recently received an order to supply 50 MW of turbines for the ACTII wind project in Pakistan.

Goldwind is set to deliver 20 units of GW 121-2.5MW high temperature model turbines to local wind project developer ACT Wind (Pvt) Ltd, the Chinese manufacturer said.

The ACTII project is sited in Jhimpir, Sindh province, in the area identified as a “wind corridor” and with around 1 GW of wind power capacity installed, according to Goldwind.

ACT Wind is the Chinese company's repeat customer, after previously purchasing Goldwind turbines for the first ACT wind project. The 30-MW ACT wind farm has been operating for about four years.

Goldwind expects to install 150 MW of turbines in Pakistan over the coming years and bring its total installed capacity in the country to 477 MW.

In November 2019, Goldwind signed a contract with Power Construction Corporation of China Ltd (SHA:601669), also known as PowerChina, to equip the 50-MW Gul Ahmed wind project in Pakistan. It has also secured the contract for the Artistic II wind farm project in the country, the company said.
Riaz Haq said…
#Pakistan’s installed #power capacity soars. With the addition of 3,933 Megawatt (MW) in 2019-20, installed capacity has jumped from 37,402MW to 41,335MW. #Fuel mix is 49.1% from indigenous resources and 50.9% from imported fuels. #electricity #energy https://tribune.com.pk/story/2242155/2-pakistans-installed-power-capacity-soars/

With a slump in demand on account of Covid-19, Pakistan’s installed capacity of electricity would jump to 41,335 Megawatt (MW), adding more woes on account of power tariff increase due to higher capacity payments and lower plant utilisation factors.

According to energy experts, most of the power plants would remain idle due to low demand of electricity in Pakistan following coronavirus-fuelled economic recession. This situation would lead to additional burden of capacity payments in the form of hike in electricity rates.

According to Covid-19 Responsive Annual Plan 2020-21, Pakistan’s power sector may face an unusual situation because of decreased demand of electric power consumption due to the outbreak. The energy demand could be suppressed for all primary energy sources like electricity, natural gas, LNG and petroleum products during the next financial year 2020-21.

In the power sector, plant utilisation factors for power generation stations will be low, increasing the cost of electricity, reveals the Annual Plan. According to it the power sector reforms would be accelerated to improve the energy transmission and distribution performance and overall management of the power sector. Special attention would be given to reduce the power losses to bring down the cost of electricity, it added.

During fiscal year 2020-21, the power generation capacity of 3,933 Megawatt (MW) including 447MW from renewable energy will be added, which will increase the existing installed capacity from 37,402MW to 41,335MW.

An amount of Rs204.54 billion has been proposed in the PSDP 2020-21 for power sector projects of generation, transmission and distribution including government budgeted, self-finance of power sector corporations excluding IPPs.

In year 2019-20, 1,441MW power will be added to the national grid. As a result, the installed capacity would be enhanced from 35,961MW to 37,402MW. As on June 2020, overall generation mix will consist of 49.1% indigenous resources and 50.9% imported fuels.

Regional connectivity

With a commitment to continue work, Pakistan has allocated Rs3 billion funds to execute Central Asia South Asia (CASA) power import project to import electricity from Central Asian States.

According to the budget document, an amount of Rs3 billion has been proposed in the Public Sector Development Programme (PSDP) 2020-21 for the project. The implementation of CASA will continue in 2020-21. The transmission capacity will be enhanced by 4,445MVA on 660Kv network to June 2021. Furthermore, about 94 kilometres and 880km transmission lines would be constructed on 500kv and 600kv, respectively.

An amount of Rs7.8 billion was allocated in PSDP 2019-20 for Central Asia South Asia (CASA) transmission project. Significant progress has been made on the transmission project envisaging laying 1,200km transmission lines for import of 1,300MW from hydel power generation from Tajikistan and Kyrgyz Republic through Afghanistan to Pakistan. The parties have signed core power agreements, including power purchase agreements (PPAs). Meanwhile, land possession has also been taken and security clearance at site is in progress.

Losses of power distribution companies are still higher than the global average of around 8%. Higher losses will be curtailed through power distribution companies’ enhancement projects. The government has given targets to distribution companies to reduce losses in the next financial year.
Riaz Haq said…
#Pakistan aims to generate 30% of its #electricity from #RenewableEnergy sources by 2030, including #wind, #solar, #biomass and small-scale #hydro https://tribune.com.pk/story/2250399/1-pakistan-aims-generate-30-clean-energy-2030/

Pakistan aims to generate 30% of its electricity from renewable energy sources by 2030 such as wind, solar, biomass and small-scale hydro.

This will complement the 27% of current electricity supply coming from large-scale hydro.

To this effect the 271 GE Renewable Energy wind turbines spreading over nine plants have a combined generating capacity of 450 megawatts (MW) – representing more than 36% of the current 1,235-MW total installed wind capacity in the country.
“Renewable energy is the future. With global warming happening, it’s good to say you’re working in the renewables business,” said GE Renewable Energy Services Manager Fawwad Haq.

“We are producing clean energy but not CO2 at these plants, so we’re giving people a better, cleaner type of energy,” he added.

Fawwad manages more than 50 wind turbine technicians who perform maintenance on hundreds of turbines at nine wind farms in the country.

A total of 233 direct and indirect employees help manage operations at eight of these plants.



Most of the wind farms that GE maintains and operates in Pakistan are located in desert regions where temperatures in early June were already in the 40s.

It takes nearly 15 minutes, with necessary water breaks along the way, to climb the 80-meter tall metal towers to reach the top of the wind turbines.

While GE provides wind turbine maintenance across all nine wind farms in Pakistan using GE turbine technology, at eight of them, the company also provides balance of plant services, including power generation and electricity dispatch to the grid.

“After I did my first climb [a couple years ago], I thought, ‘Oh, this is difficult!’ But after a few times, I adjusted to it and now it’s fine,” recalls Fawwad, adding, “The way things are going, renewables will capture a larger share of energy generation in the years to come, not only Pakistan, but in the rest of the world as well.”

He said during his working experience at conventional power generation was quite different as there were separate specialist technicians for mechanical, electrical and instrumentation work. “That’s not the case with wind turbines.”

“Only one team goes up and must be an electrical and mechanical all in one. You need to perform the preventative maintenance and troubleshooting.”
Riaz Haq said…
#UN #SDGs: #Pakistan has achieved ‘Climate Action’ goal 10 years ahead of the deadline, a recognition of Pakistan’s commitment to fighting #climatechange, but also an endorsement of the success of #ImranKhan govt's initiatives. #ClimateAction #PTI | https://tribune.com.pk/article/97098/how-successful-has-pakistans-climate-change-fight-been

According to the Sustainable Development Report 2020, an annual global assessment of countries’ progress towards achieving the United Nations led Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), Pakistan has achieved the ‘Climate Action’ SDG ten years ahead of the deadline. This is not only a recognition of Pakistan’s renewed commitment to fighting climate change, but also an endorsement of the success of numerous environmental protection initiatives launched by the government.

Traditionally, climate change has not been a key agenda item in Pakistan’s public discourse which over time has resulted in a gross underestimation of the gravity of the situation. Therefore, it is important to begin by recognising that climate change is a very real threat to Pakistan’s long-term prosperity and survival. According to the Global Climate Risk Index, Pakistan was the 5th most affected country by the impact of climate change during the twenty-year period from 1999-2018. The Index used a weighted score, based on climate change mediated death toll and loss to the economy (in purchasing power parity terms), to calculate a Climate Risk Index (CRI) score which was then used to rank countries.

With rising Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions and a dwindling forest cover, Pakistan’s annual mean temperature is estimated to rise by three to five degrees Celsius by the end of the century. Already, cities such as Turbat and Nawabshah are witnessing record high temperatures, confirming the worst fears of climate change scientists. The rising temperatures will over time result in rapid melting of the glaciers that feed Pakistan’s rivers, as well as in a projected 60 cm rise in the sea level by the year 2100. Coupled with a high variability in precipitation, these changes are expected to lead to an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events such as heat waves, floods, droughts and tropical storms, jeopardising Pakistan’s agriculture, economy, water and food security, as well as the health of the country’s inhabitants.

Despite the seriousness of the threat, Pakistan’s fight against climate change did not really take off until 2013. The origins of the new-found fervor can be traced back to the Billion Trees Afforestation Project (BTAP), popularly known as Billion Tree Tsunami. Through BTAP, over a five-year period the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) government in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa restored 350,000 hectares of forestland employing a combination of natural regeneration and planned afforestation. As a result, the province’s forest cover increased by about five per cent and half a million green jobs were created. The initiative received global acclaim after a third-party audit by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) confirmed nearly 85% average survival of the plantations. It exceeded the province’s Bonn Challenge commitment and was hailed as a “true conservation success story” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Not only did the successful execution of BTAP make climate change a significant issue of public interest in Pakistan, it also served to put the country on the map in the global fight against climate change.

Since 2018, Pakistan’s fight against climate change has picked up further pace. There has been a discernible shift in the government’s priorities with the emergence of an overarching “Green Growth Agenda” that has informed several initiatives across the country. With an aim to replicate the success of BTAP on a national level, ...
Riaz Haq said…
#Pakistan's Rural Transformation With #Education, #Remittances, #Healthcare & #Communications: Motorized Vehicles replacing horses & bulls, sturdy brick/cement replacing mud houses, TVs & Mobile Phones everywhere, Migrant workers bringing money & ideas. https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/685889-changing-landscape-of-village-life-in-pakistan

Islamabad:The countryside life in far-flung areas of Pakistan, once considered totally isolated and secluded from the rest of the world and devoid of modern-day facilities, has undergone a massive transformation during the last two decades or so by changing the entire landscape of village life.

The rural life is often considered backward, fixed and hostage to tribal culture and traditions. Similarly, the popular social discourse that nothing has changed in Pakistan contradicts with historical facts.

Looking at the national picture of rural life in Pakistan rapid changes have occurred in almost all spheres of life from communication to education, socialization to healthcare, transportation to banking, governance to farming and cultivation to harvesting due to technological advancement, developmental works, penetration of information technology, remittances and domestic tourism.

Among others, the two factors of economic and technological developments as the agent of change had proved instrumental in shaping the process of change not only in the urban areas but also in suburbs of the country. Not more than twenty years ago when mobility was considered difficult in the remote areas not only due to missing road infrastructure but also due to poor transportation facilities.

‘Tonga,’ a carriage pulled by a horse, was the only facility for public transport while bullock-cart was commonplace phenomena for weight transportation in almost all small villages. The houses made of mud have also slowly been replaced by cemented buildings while the social structure was also changed due to disintegration of combined family structure to separate family system.

Likewise, only a few professions of handicrafts have survived due innovation to capture the pace of time and demand of the market while others have totally faded away. Similarly, the obsolete tools, techniques and methods are no more used in farming, cultivation and harvesting due to low production. Therefore, it could not survive at all in the face of modern technologies.

The media revolution in the country with more than 100 private TV channels has brought the whole world at the doorstep of the villagers while the mobile phone companies and 3G/4G technologies have brought it further closer to the palms of people. Hardly there is anyone left without having a smartphone even in the remotest parts of the country.

Almost everybody has got access to the unbridled flow of information on social media in every nook and corner of the country. Thus the electronic media and communication technologies have brought together the collective experiences of the whole world into rural households. The occupation and profession in rural areas once used to be farming and handicraft only. Now it has also transformed into government services, urban migration, overseas workers and businesses. The migrant workers are not only bringing money to the rural economy, but also ideas and experiences about how people in urban areas and the world outside live.

The villages, the basic components of civilization, where a large segment of society is living, have either transformed into model villages/towns or merged with nearby cities having urbanized lifestyle and lots of hustle and bustle. But in developed parts of the globe, the difference between village and city life is still quite visible due to well-planned construction, proper waste disposal mechanism, sewerage system, cleanliness and greenery.
Riaz Haq said…
State Bank of #Pakistan goes green, expands #renewable energy financing scheme under Category II for customers and Category III for vendors. The SBP has also launched a Shariah-compliant version of the scheme. #solar #wind - Profit by Pakistan Today https://profit.pakistantoday.com.pk/2020/07/22/sbp-goes-green-expands-renewable-energy-refinance-scheme/#.XxiSW35mvY4.twitter

In an attempt to encourage clean energy in the country, the State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) has enhanced the scope of its Refinance Scheme for Renewable Energy, according to a statement issued on Wednesday.

The scheme allows financing under category III to solar and wind-based energy sale companies. After feedback received from stakeholders, the size of the project established by the vendor, supplier, or energy sale company has been increased from 1MW to 5MW. The cumulative financing limit has also been increased from Rs1 billion to Rs2 billion.

“This revision in the scheme is expected to not only attract fresh local and foreign investment in the sector but also facilitate production of clean energy in the country, helping in managing climate change,” the SBP said.

The SBP Financing Scheme for Renewable Energy was announced in June 2016, with an aim to help address the challenges of energy shortages and climate change in the country.

Initially, the scheme had two categories. Category 1 allowed financing for setting up of renewable energy power projects, with the capacity ranging from 1MW to 50MW for own use or selling of electricity to the national grid, or combination of both.

Category II allowed financing to domestic, agriculture, commercial and industrial borrowers to install renewable energy-based projects of up to 1MW to generate electricity for own use or selling to the grid and distribution company under net metering.

Later, in July 2019, the SBP introduced Category III for facilitating financing to vendors and suppliers to install wind and solar systems of up to 1MW. The SBP also launched a Shariah-compliant version of the scheme in August 2019.

Since the introduction of the scheme, total outstanding financing under the scheme has reached Rs15.6 billion for 217 projects. This has the potential of adding 292MW to energy supply.
Riaz Haq said…
As developed nations turn away from coal-fired power, Chinese funding has helped the dirtiest fossil fuel take off in Pakistan.


https://financialpost.com/pmn/business-pmn/china-push-sees-coal-fired-generation-rise-to-record-in-pakistan


Coal’s surge in the South Asian nation is symbolic of the difficult choice that the region’s developing countries face as they seek affordable energy to support economic growth while trying to limit chronic air pollution. Asian demand is expected to support the commodity as its usage drops in most of the developed world in a transition to cleaner or renewable energy sources.

Is Canada's real estate forecast too optimistic?

 

Pakistan’s coal-fired power generation jumped 57% to a record in the fiscal year through June, according to data from the government’s National Electric Power Regulatory Authority. Coal accounted for about a fifth of total output, backed by supplies from the country’s first coal mine in its Thar region, developed as part of China’s Belt and Road plan.

Coal is set to expand further as China pushes funds into building more power plants in the country and mines to feed them. Pakistan is one of the flagship markets for China’s Belt and Road initiative, with more than $70 billion of projects including coal and liquefied natural gas fired power plants helping the nation end decades of electricity shortfalls.


“China has been cutting back on coal at home but it has no compunction about using coal in things that it funds outside of China,” said James Dorsey, a senior fellow at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore. “Chinese can be willing but they need a partner to go along with them. In this case it’s the Pakistani government.”

Belt and Road progress has slowed recently with overseas energy spending last year dropping to the lowest in a decade, dogged by accusations that China is luring poor countries into debt traps for its own political and strategic gain. China’s President Xi Jinping has publicly urged more clean energy as part of the program, and the plan found new life in Pakistan recently with an agreement to build two hydro-power generation projects.

Until 2016, Pakistan had just one coal-burning power plant. It now has at least nine and more are in the making. The first target of these plants has been to replace expensive fuel oil-based generation facilities that burdened the nation’s economy with heavy costs and pollution.

The rise in coal power has come because of supplies from the Thar coal mine, Power Ministry spokesman Zafar Yab Khan said. The country will balance rising coal use with more renewable energy and its coal plants will use low-emissions technology, he said.


With the shift to coal, average generation costs dropped 11% during the fiscal year, according to data from Karachi-based brokerage Arif Habib.

“Pakistan has increased coal-based generation to make it its new base to replace its previous expensive fuel oil-powered power plants,” said Tahir Abbas, head of research at Arif Habib. “This has also helped bring down the power prices, energy import bill and increase the share of an indigenous energy source.”
Riaz Haq said…
#CleanEnergy: Under Nia #Pakistan Solarization Project, 7,227 schools provided with #solar power & #energy efficient fans & #LED light bulbs. 2,400 Basic Health Units to get Hybrid Solar PV system, benefiting an estimated 168,000 patients every day - https://www.newsweekpakistan.com/towards-clean-and-green-energy/

The Nia Pakistan project is supported by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), which had approved a Disbursement Link Indicators-based loan of $83.69 million under its Access to Clean Energy Investment Program during the previous government’s tenure. However, there was no progress on it and right after taking charge, I took the project out of cold storage, fast-tracked it and put it on speedy execution.

As of this writing, 7,227 schools have been provided with solar power under this project, including installation of energy efficient fans and light bulbs. In the first phase, we are determined to convert to solar some 10,861 primary schools by the end this year. Schools located in off-grid areas, including some 1,794 that have never had access to electricity, would be prioritized.

The second phase will involve solarization of an additional 4,500 schools in the rest of northern and central Punjab. Similarly, over 2,400 Basic Health Units from all over the province would also be converted into Hybrid Solar PV system, benefiting an estimated 168,000 patients every day. The conversion of public sector universities, colleges, hospitals and other public sector buildings to solar energy is also under process.

The Punjab Energy Department plans to convert 60 public sector universities in the province to solar on fast-track basis and Memorandums of Understanding have already been inked with 16 varsities in this regard. The groundbreaking ceremony of converting the University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore to solar power was performed last month, while the THQ Teaching Hospital, Dera Ghazi Khan, and the Government Comprehensive High School, Gujranwala have already been solarized.
Riaz Haq said…
#Pakistan’s largest #motorcycle maker goes solar with 2.5 MW solar at Sheikupura plant. A large number of manufacturing and assembling units in the country were opting for #renewable energy (captive) generation to secure uninterrupted supply and cut costs. https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/728485-pakistan-s-largest-bike-maker-goes-solar

A large number of manufacturing and assembling units in the country were opting for renewable energy (captive) generation to secure uninterrupted supply and cut costs. Alpha Beta Core CEO Khurram Schehzad said many companies had installed captive power plants to secure uninterrupted power supply and ensure efficiencies. “Earlier, the captive generation was gas-based, but now the gas is a scarce and expensive commodity, so companies are opting for renewable captive generation.”

Several other companies and manufacturing concerns including P&G, Service Industries Limited, Kohinoor Textile Mills, Fauji Cement Company Eni, and DP World have installed solar power generation to meet their energy requirements. In addition to this, several others have entered into bulk power procurement agreements with alternate energy producers, while a large number of sugar millers have already setup biogas plants.

Khurram said gas shortage, lower costs and commitment to a clean environment were compelling companies to switch to alternate energy resources. “Captive renewable energy offers short-term as well as long-term efficiencies while being environment-friendly. Corporate sector should play a leading role in this transition.” Pakistan enjoys a geo-strategic advantage for producing abundant amounts of solar energy.

Hence, solar technology could save millions of dollars for the country’s economic growth, while also offering various ecological benefits.

Riaz Haq said…
#UN Chief calls on humanity to end war on nature, go carbon-free. Says “Apocalyptic fires and floods, cyclones and hurricanes are increasingly the new normal". #climatechange #fossilfuel #carbonemissions #GlobalWarming https://lasvegassun.com/news/2020/dec/02/un-calls-on-humanity-to-end-war-on-nature-go-carbo/#.X8fTOy2xQTk.twitter via @LasVegasSun

Governments in the Group of 20 major and emerging economies have so far committed more money to prop up fossil fuel sectors than to boost the rollout of renewable energy, the report found.

Co-author Ivetta Gerasimchuk of the International Institute for Sustainable Development said investing in oil, coal and gas no longer makes economic sense because renewable energy is becoming cheaper than fossil fuels. But, she said, “We see that instead of governments letting these fossil fuel projects die they resurrect them from the dead.”

The WMO’s report found global warming is worsening in all seven key climate indicators, but the problem is increasing human suffering in an already bad year.

“In 2020, over 50 million people have been doubly hit: by climate-related disasters (floods, droughts and storms) and the COVID-19 pandemic,’’ the report said. ”Countries in Central America are suffering from the triple-impact of hurricanes Eta and Iota, COVID-19 and pre-existing humanitarian crises.”

Among the dozens of extremes the report highlighted:

-- A record 30 Atlantic named tropical storms and hurricanes.

--Death Valley, California, hit 129.9 degrees (54.4 degrees Celsius), the hottest the world has seen in 80 years.

--Record wildfires struck California and Colorado in the western United States, following a major fire season and record heat in Australia.

--The Arctic had record wildfires and a prolonged heat wave culminating in a 100-degree mark (38 degrees Celsius) in Siberia in June.

--Record low Arctic sea ice was reported for April and August and the yearly minimum, in September, was the second lowest on record.

--More than 2,000 people died in record summer rains and flooding in Pakistan and surrounding nations.

While these events can’t solely be blamed on climate change, “these are the types of events scientists fear will increase due to climate change,” said Cornell University climate scientist Natalie Mahowald, who wasn’t part of the report.

“Human activities are at the root of our descent towards chaos,” Guterres said. “But that means human action can solve it.”
Riaz Haq said…
Pakistan Decides Against New Coal-fired Power

By 2030, Khan said, 60% of all energy produced in Pakistan will be clean and obtained through renewable resources, while 30% of all vehicles will run on electricity.

https://www.voanews.com/south-central-asia/pakistan-decides-against-new-coal-fired-power


Khan’s government, which took power more than two years ago, has also undertaken a countrywide reforestation campaign to plant more than 3 billion trees by mid-2023 to mitigate the effects of climate change. The massive program, dubbed the Ten Billion Tree Tsunami, went into effect last year, and officials say it has planted more than 500 million saplings across Pakistan.

Riaz Haq said…
#Pakistan's $30 million #solar project to power 200,000 rural homes in #Sindh. The World Bank is financing SSEP Project with $100 million additional loan for utility-scale solar power, distributed solar on public buildings, and solar systems to households. https://gn24.ae/b2b23f0c6a48000

The provincial government has finalised the environment-friendly project with the suppliers to provide solar-powered electricity to 200,000 households in 10 districts of Sindh, the provincial energy minister Imtiaz Shaikh said. The 10 districts include Badin, Tharparkar, Khairpur, Sujawal, Mithi, Sanghar, Ghotki, Kashmore, Jacobabad and Qambar Shahdadkot.

The $30 million initiative for rural households with low or no grid access is part of the Sindh Solar Energy Project (SSEP) that aims to increase solar power generation and access to electricity in Sindh province. The World Bank has provided $100 million of financing for SSEP to support utility-scale solar power, distributed solar on and around public buildings, and provision of solar systems to households.

The SSEP project includes a 400MW solar park at Manjhand town in Jamshoro district at a cost of $40 million, a $25 million project to install rooftop solar systems on public sector buildings in Karachi and Hyderabad with 20MW capacity, and the $30 million to provide 200,000 rural households access to affordable solar home systems.

Coal-free future
Pakistan is investing in the renewable energy transition to harness clean energy sources such as solar, wind, hydropower, geothermal and biomass to meet current energy challenges as well as the future demand. The country is moving towards a coal-free future with focus on clean energy. In December 2020, Prime Minister Imran Khan announced that the country will not approve new coal-fired power generation projects as part of its contribution to global efforts against climate change. Pakistan also aims to produce 60 per cent of its energy through renewable resources by 2030.

Pakistan’s energy mix
Pakistan, which experiences critical energy crisis, currently generates its power from an energy mix that includes oil, gas (natural gas and liquefied natural gas, LNG), coal, nuclear and renewable sources such as solar, wind and hydro energy, biomass. In the last five years, 18 wind power projects of 937MW, six solar power projects of 418MW and six 201MW bagasse projects were added to the national grid.

Thermal (fossil fuels) – 58.4%

Hydro – 30%

Renewable and nuclear – 10.6%
Riaz Haq said…
#Norway's Scatec & #Pakistan's Nizam #Energy get financing for $100 million, 150 MW #solar plant in #Sukkur, for 150,000 homes. 75% funding to come from Dutch development bank FMO, Faysal Bank, Bank of Punjab, & PAK Kuwait Investment. https://www.power-technology.com/news/scatec-nizam-energy-close-financing-solar-project-sukkur-pakistan/ via @Power_OnlineMag

Renewable developer Scatec and local partner Nizam Energy have secured a $100m financial closure for a solar project in Pakistan.

The closure comes after the Dutch development bank FMO, Faysal Bank, Bank of Punjab, and PAK Kuwait Investment signed credit agreements for the non-recourse debt financing agreement.

The credit facilities will cover up to 75% of the total cost of the 150MW Sukkur project. Scatec and Nizam Energy intend to start construction within the first half of this year.

Scatec CEO Raymond Carlsen said: “We are proud to complete the financing of our first project in Pakistan together with our partners.

“The government plans to increase the share of renewable energy to 30% by 2030 and we look forward to supporting this growth by delivering 305GWh of clean power annually.

“This is enough to cover the electricity needs of about 150,000 households and will contribute to avoiding more than 106,000t of GHG emissions per annum.”

FMO agreed to provide half of the debt quantum under a credit facility of $39m. Three local commercial lenders will provide the remaining half under credit facilities of an aggregated $42m (PKR6.7bn).

Located in the Sindh province, south-east of Pakistan, the Sukkur project portfolio was awarded a ‘costs plus tariff’ agreement by the National Energy Power Regulatory Authority early last year.
Riaz Haq said…
A massive solar energy project to power more than 200,000 homes in Pakistan’s southern Sindh province has been initiated.

https://gulfnews.com/world/asia/pakistan/pakistan-solar-project-to-power-200000-homes-in-sindh-1.76827166

The provincial government has finalised the environment-friendly project with the suppliers to provide solar-powered electricity to 200,000 households in 10 districts of Sindh, the provincial energy minister Imtiaz Shaikh said. The 10 districts include Badin, Tharparkar, Khairpur, Sujawal, Mithi, Sanghar, Ghotki, Kashmore, Jacobabad and Qambar Shahdadkot.

The $30 million initiative for rural households with low or no grid access is part of the Sindh Solar Energy Project (SSEP) that aims to increase solar power generation and access to electricity in Sindh province. The World Bank has provided $100 million of financing for SSEP to support utility-scale solar power, distributed solar on and around public buildings, and provision of solar systems to households.


The SSEP project includes a 400MW solar park at Manjhand town in Jamshoro district at a cost of $40 million, a $25 million project to install rooftop solar systems on public sector buildings in Karachi and Hyderabad with 20MW capacity, and the $30 million to provide 200,000 rural households access to affordable solar home systems.

Riaz Haq said…
#China's LONGi Partners with #Pakistan's Reon #Energy (owned by Dawood Group). The 70MWp #solar project will be divided into 4-5 ground-mounted clusters at different Fauji #cement production sites. It will be completed by Q3/2021. #renewableenergy
https://www.pv-magazine.com/press-releases/longi-partners-with-reon-energy-pushes-forward-commercial-energy-transition-in-pakistan/

The project owner is a leading cement group, the 70MWp project will be divided into 4-5 ground-mounted clusters at its different production sites. It is expected to be the largest commercial PV application in Pakistan upon completion. The project is scheduled to commence operations from the third quarter of 2021.

Reon Energy will perform EPC for the projects. The company has extensive experiences in solar projects, and is one of a few companies able to build large-scale solar facilities for industries throughout Pakistan.

LONGi is selected as the sole solar module supplier for Reon’s largest project to date. After carefully evaluated and analyzed, Reon Energy has chosen LONGi’s Hi-MO 5 series which represents highest module efficiency and reliability. In addition, comparing with other options available in the market, Hi-MO5 series can reduce over $1 US cent in BOS cost and saving nearly 5% project land usage, maximizing its EPC margin.
Riaz Haq said…
Overall, Pakistan attracted more than 50% of renewable energy investments (47% of which in hydropower), while Russia and Indonesia received predominantly fossil fuel related energy investments. (Green Belt and Road BRI Initiative)

https://green-bri.org/china-belt-and-road-initiative-bri-investment-report-2020/


Among the BRI countries, investments were spread broadly across the continents. The countries that received most investments were Vietnam, Indonesia, Pakistan and Chile. Particularly Vietnam saw a strong increase of Chinese investments – an increase of over 200% compared to 2019, possibly driven by near-shoring to avoid American sanctions. Other BRI countries that saw increases of Chinese investments despite the COVID-19 pandemic include Poland, Bulgaria, Serbia, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Chile, as well as Thailand.


Analyzing Chinese energy investments in different countries, we find that Pakistan was the country, which received most energy investments from 2013 to 2020, followed by the Russian Federation and Indonesia. Pakistan is both the largest recipient of coal-related investments and also the largest recipient of investments in hydropower. Overall, Pakistan attracted more than 50% of renewable energy investments (47% of which in hydropower), while Russia and Indonesia received predominantly fossil fuel related energy investments.


----------

Rail: Rail investments included high-speed rail projects connecting China through Thailand and Malaysia to Singapore (Kunming-Singapore rail). A deal of the first 40km segment of the China-Thailand high-speed rail linking Bangkok to Thailand’s border with Laos was signed in December 2020. China is also building a US$6 bn high-speed rail connecting 142 km between Jakarta and Bandung in Indonesia. Furthermore, China has been engaged in building several railway projects on the African continent (e.g. Standard Gauge Railways in Kenya and Ethiopia). China also invested in rail in Europe, such as the Budapest-Belgrade railway. China also invested in several urban rail transport projects, such as US$900 million in a subway in Hanoi, Vietnam (which has been delayed) or the US$1.6 billion metro line in Lahore, Pakistan opened in October 2020.

Road-transport: China invested across all countries with investments including road construction in Pakistan (e.g. Karakoram Highway connecting China and Pakistan all the way to Pakistan’s Gwadar Port). In 2020 investments in road infrastructure decreased by close to 70% to about US$4 billion.

Ports: Pakistan is also one of the largest recipients of Chinese investments in port infrastructure, such as the Gwadar port operated by China Overseas Port Holding Company, which is a strategically important and also contested investment for China. Other strategic port investments can be found in Piraeus, Greece or in Lamu and Mobasa, Kenya, as well as in Djibouti. A recent US$3 billion agreement to commission Croatia’s largest port (Rijeka Port) to a consortium of three Chinese contractors has been cancelled at the beginning of 2021.

Riaz Haq said…
Pakistan leapfrogging to a green energy future
18 September 2020
Author: Maha Qasim, Islamabad

https://www.eastasiaforum.org/2020/09/18/pakistan-leapfrogging-to-a-green-energy-future/#:~:text=In%20August%202020%2C%20the%20Pakistan,30%20per%20cent%20by%202030.

In August 2020, the Pakistan government formally approved the Alternative and Renewable Energy Policy 2019. The new policy aims to boost the share of electricity generated from renewable sources from around 5 per cent at present to 20 per cent by 2025 and 30 per cent by 2030.


To encourage the shift to renewables and empower the domestic industrial sector, the policy offers generous tax benefits to investors, encourages lower tariffs by introducing competitive bidding, and incentivises local production of renewable energy equipment such as wind turbines and solar panels.

The recent introduction of net-metering legislation for solar installations allows consumers to sell power to the grid. This is expediting the adoption of rooftop solar by homeowners and presents an opportunity to electrify remote villages and commercial enterprises that have sufficient rooftop space and available land.

Around 1000 MW of wind power has also been developed over the last few years. Wind power receives the highest level of private sector interest due to bite-size investment requirements and a relatively short gestation period. Utility-scale wind and solar plants could soon be augmented by battery storage to overcome the challenge of intermittent power supply.

The National Electric Vehicles Policy launched last year also promotes the large scale adoption of electric vehicles in an effort to combat urban air pollution and provides incentives to jumpstart the local electric vehicle manufacturing industry. The shift to electric vehicles could play a significant role in reducing Pakistan’s oil import bill and securing the transport sector against international price shocks, while also creating numerous green business and employment opportunities.

Pakistan currently imports almost a third of its energy resources in the form of oil, LNG and coal. An import-driven energy policy is not sustainable for Pakistan as it contributes to long-term energy insecurity, exposing the economy to energy price shocks and the risk of inflation. Inflationary pressures reduce the competitiveness of the country’s exports, further constraining Pakistan’s capacity to pay for energy imports.

The rapid adoption and upscaling of green energy solutions in the form of distributed generation, smart metering and electric vehicles — coupled with investments in utility-scale renewable energy power plants and increased energy conservation efforts — will significantly reduce energy imports and decrease the cost of electricity. This amounts to greater self-sufficiency and energy security for Pakistan.

Thanks to infrastructure and energy projects built under the China–Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), Pakistan has managed to plug the energy shortfall that has plagued the country for several years. The government has various power projects in the pipeline and forecasts surplus generation capacity in the next decade — a surplus that could benefit the growing electric vehicles sector.
Riaz Haq said…
#Karachi-based Denim-Maker Artistic Milliners Makes $370M Investment in #Hydropower Projects in #Pakistan demonstrating commitment to sustainability. It will also include the development of wind and solar projects, as well as an operational #wind farm. https://sourcingjournal.com/denim/denim-mills/artistic-milliners-hydropower-projects-pakistan-energy-generation-ushu-river-264756/

Karachi, Pakistan-based denim manufacturer Artistic Milliners further demonstrated its commitment to sustainability with a $370 million investment in two run of river hydropower projects.

Artistic Milliners’ hydropower plants, Hydro I and Artistic Hydro II, will contribute a combined 521 GWh per year. According to Italian energy company ERG SpA, that’s enough energy to meet the demand of more than 133,000 homes. Both plants are located in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, with Artistic I Hydro pulling from the Panjkora River and Artistic II Hydro pulling from the Ushu River.


The project will also include the development of wind and solar projects, as well as an operational wind farm.

Regulatory authorities are currently processing generation licenses and tariffs needed for the projects, and commercial operation is slated to begin by December 2027.

According to the International Hydropower Association, renewable hydropower is a clean and low-cost source of electricity generation and responsible water management. Specifically, run-of-river hydropower channels flowing water from a river to spin a turbine. This form of energy uses water flow that is regulated by the facility for a continuous supply of electricity. It’s currently a significant energy source in Pakistan, representing around 25 percent of capacity and 21 percent of generation.

This investment is part of Artistic Milliner’s overall commitment to the land in which it operates. At the end of last year, Artistic Milliners launched the Milliner Cotton Initiative, a call for visibility and women empowerment throughout the cotton supply chain. It also encompasses capacity building for ginners and promotes practices for mitigating extortion throughout the Rahim Yar Khan district of Punjab, Pakistan.

Artistic Milliners is also the first and only Pakistan-based company to abide by the United Nations’ 1.5°C-compliant business model to help mitigate the climate crisis. It has aggressive sustainability targets in place to reach net zero emission by 2025.
Riaz Haq said…
JinkoSolar signs 100MW module supply deal in ‘key market’ Pakistan

https://www.pv-tech.org/jinkosolar-signs-100mw-module-supply-deal-in-key-market-pakistan/

JinkoSolar has secured an agreement that will see its Tiger and Tiger Pro 530 / 535W modules be marketed and distributed in Pakistan throughout 2021.

The company has signed a 100MW module supply deal and formed a long-term development partnership with Pakistani solar firm AE Power.

Farhan Qurban, country manager of Pakistan at JinkoSolar, said the country “has had an impressive boom” in recent years and is currently “one of the key markets” for the company in Asia.

“The 100MW distribution agreement for 2021 between AE Power and JinkoSolar in the Pakistan market represents the first important step of the long-term partnership between the two companies,” he added.

To date, JinkoSolar has supplied up to 30MW of its Tiger Pro modules to Pakistan. The company is set to double production of the Tiger Pro series this year, thanks to the upcoming completion of the first 10GW phase of a new solar cell manufacturing base in Yunnan Province, China.

AE Power CEO Rana Abbas said: “The 100MW distribution contract for 2021 opens up ideal cooperation opportunities for construction companies and rooftop solar power developers in Pakistan in using clean energy at average prices.”

Pakistan aims to generate 30% of its electricity from renewable energy sources by 2030.

--------------------

AE Power Focuses on the manufacturing of top quality photovoltaic modules and specializes in PV Technology innovation, application, and system development. The company is a KEY COMPONENT SUPPLIER and PROJECT DEVELOPER. AE Power’s global sales and marketing network Successfully provides end-users with accessible clean energy, whilst promoting its core brand values of STABILITY, DURABILITY, and RELIABILITY. We provide international and local warranty in Pakistan.

https://aepower.pk/about-us/
Riaz Haq said…
Imports of solar panels have risen from as little as $1 million in 2004 to a peak of $772 million in the fiscal year ending June 30, 2017. While they have since dropped down to $409 million in fiscal 2019, the country’s imports of solar panels appear to be a strong upward trajectory, growing at an average rate of 15.9% per year in US dollar terms (22.6% per year in Pakistani rupee terms) in the five years between 2014 and 2019.



https://profit.pakistantoday.com.pk/2020/05/04/solar-is-the-future-so-might-as-well-hurry/



While a substantial portion of those imports are for grid-scale projects, a significant proportion are for domestic, commercial, and industrial users who are not necessarily connected to the grid.
Riaz Haq said…
Why Covering Canals With Solar Panels Is a Power Move
Covering waterways would, in a sense, make solar panels water-cooled, boosting their efficiency.

https://www.wired.com/story/why-covering-canals-with-solar-panels-is-a-power-move/


Scientists in California just ran the numbers on what would happen if their state slapped solar panels on 4,000 miles of its canals, including the major California Aqueduct, and the results point to a potentially beautiful partnership. Their feasibility study, published in the journal Nature Sustainability, finds that if applied statewide, the panels would save 63 billion gallons of water from evaporating each year. At the same time, solar panels across California’s exposed canals would provide 13 gigawatts of renewable power annually, about half of the new capacity the state needs to meet its decarbonization goals by the year 2030.

California’s water conveyance system is the world’s largest, serving 35 million people and 5.7 million acres of farmland. Seventy-five percent of available water is in the northern third of the state, while the bottom two-thirds of the state accounts for 80 percent of urban and agricultural demand. Shuttling all that water around requires pumps to make it flow uphill; accordingly, the water system is the state’s largest single consumer of electricity.

---------------------

Govt plans to install floating solar panels on dams
They will help reduce evaporation of water, generate clean electricity

https://tribune.com.pk/story/2110629/2-govt-plans-install-floating-solar-panels-dams

He (Minister Omar Ayub) announced that the government was planning to install floating solar panels on the country’s big water reservoirs and along canals in a bid to generate thousands of megawatts of clean energy.

This is part of the government’s plan to give priority to an increase in the share of renewable energy in the total energy mix.

He revealed that floating solar panels would be installed on Tarbela, Mangla, Ghazi Barotha and Khanpur reservoirs besides canals. “It will not only help to reduce evaporation of water but will also generate electricity,” the minister emphasised.

Speaking at a conference on “Water Crisis: An Imminent Danger to Pakistan’s Stability”, Khan warned India that Pakistan would swiftly retaliate if New Delhi violated the Indus Waters Treaty.

“If India tries to make the Indus Waters Treaty as a weapon, then answer from Pakistan will be swift as we will defend our sovereignty.”

He urged the international community to take notice of Indian atrocities in the occupied valley of Kashmir.

He was of the view that if proper investment was made in the water sector, especially in water storages, then it had the potential to take up the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) growth by one percentage point.

Despite its importance in economic growth, the minister decried, no work was carried out for the construction of dams after Tarbela and Mangla and no big dam was commissioned after 1960.

“Our government is actively working on a plan to harness the water resources in order to add 18,000-20,000 megawatts of hydroelectric power to the system,” he said. The minister pointed out that the current installed power generation capacity from all sources stood at 31,000MW, which would be enhanced to 55,000MW by 2030.

By the year 2025, around 8,000MW of renewable energy would be added to the system and 20,000MW would be added by 2030, he anticipated.
Riaz Haq said…
LONGi Solar has taken its confirmed solar module orders from Pakistan this year to 500MW, the majority of which it said were for its Hi-MO 5 series.

https://www.pv-tech.org/longi-solar-takes-pakistan-module-orders-to-500mw-as-country-momentum-builds/

LONGi said more than 80% of orders secured in the country, equivalent to around 422MWp, were for the Hi-MO 5 series of modules which come in power output variants of up to 540W.

Among the clients LONGi has secured in the country are Reon Energy, which is to develop Pakistan’s largest commercial solar project to date – and among the largest commercial rooftops outside of China – at 70MWp. The project is due to enter commercial operations in Q3 2021.

Dennis She, senior vice president at LONGi Solar, said the module manufacturer was committed to helping its customers in Pakistan contribute towards the country’s “path towards greater energy independence”.

“As Pakistan is prioritizing its energy generation methods and enhancing capacity to produce clean energy in order to meet growing demand without degrading the environment, energy project cooperation is playing a pivotal role,” he said.

Amidst a sizeable energy deficit where demand far outstrips power supply in Pakistan, the country is quickly turning to renewable power to bolster its power generation base. As of 30 June 2020, Pakistan had an operational solar generation capacity of 530MW, equivalent to around 1.36% of the country’s total power generation capacity of just over 38.7GW. Renewables in total contribute just 4% to total power output.

But Pakistan maintains an ambition to see that share rise to 30% by 2030, and sizeable additions to the country’s renewables portfolio are planned. LONGi cited estimates that between 565MW and 1,120MW of new solar capacity will be added this year, followed by between 623MW and 1,287MW in 2022.
Riaz Haq said…
Pakistan’s installed PV capacity will likely increase from around 1.3 GW at the end of 2019 to 12.8 GW by 2030 and 26.9 GW by 2047, according to the Indicative Generation Capacity Expansion Plan – IGCEP 2047, which was recently published by the National Electric Power Regulatory Authority (NEPRA).


https://www.pv-magazine.com/2020/05/01/pakistani-regulator-expects-solar-capacity-to-hit-27-gw-by-2047/

NERPA's base-case scenario predicts that overall generation capacity will grow from 33,000 MW in 2020 to around 168,200 MW in 2047. But coal and hydropower will still account for 36% and 42% of total capacity, at 32,948 MW and 55,836 MW, respectively.

By 2030, the share of wind and solar in the overall energy mix will likely increase from about 3% in 2020 to 23%. “Beyond 2030, share of solar and wind plants decreases due to the increase in the number of new local coal-based plants having greater capacity factors,” NERPA said.

However, it also acknowledges that wind and solar are becoming the cheapest forms of new electricity generation. “They are set to replace the conventional fuels to great extent for power generation to meet the future demand growth,” NEPRA said. “The cheaper and widely accessible renewable energy has the potential to substantially decrease the reliability of power sector on expensive imported fuels.”

The organization also predicts that solar power plant capex in Pakistan will drop from $530/kW in 2020 to $371/kW by 2030. A global outlook report that was recently published by SolarPower Europe also predicted that Pakistan will deploy close to 5 GW of solar capacity by 2022.
Riaz Haq said…
State Bank of #Pakistan has provided Rs36 billion in financing for 521 #renewableenergy projects producing approximately 850MW. It offers financing options ranging from Rs400 million to Rs6 billion for a range of entities and persons #solar #wind #hydro https://www.dawn.com/news/1622092


The State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) has been providing financing on a large scale to promote renewable energy that helped Unilever Pakistan run its 30 per cent plants on renewable energy, central bank governor Dr Reza Baqir said on Tuesday.

Addressing a joint webinar hosted by the SBP and Unilever Pakistan to create awareness about the former’s Financing Scheme for Renewable Energy (FSRE), Dr Baqir said that as of February 2021, financing of around Rs36 billion has been extended for 521 projects producing approximately 850MW.

Financing for sustainable development is the need of the hour and financial institutions have a crucial role in this area, he added.

FSRE aims to encourage investments for clean energy in Pakistan, the SBP governor said, adding that this is part of the country’s efforts to diversify the energy mix and reduce climate change impact.


The scheme offers varied financing options ranging from Rs400 million to Rs6 billion for a range of entities and persons, he said.

This includes captive energy units as well as commercial projects and individual consumers who may share excess production with the national grid.

The SBP issued its FSRE in 2016 and based on positive feedback the scheme was revised in July 2019. The SBP also introduced a Sharia-compliant version of this scheme in August 2019. The scheme aims at meeting Pakistan’s growing electricity demand through renewable energy and promoting clean energy projects as part of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

It promotes the use of indigenous resources such as wind, solar and hydro power to generate electricity as well as encourages the use of renewable energy at consumer level.

Dr Baqir said that Pakistan faces challenge as a result of climate change and adopting prevention strategies are of paramount importance. In this regard the SBP has issued FSRE with a view to promoting renewable energy projects.

He highlighted the key features of the scheme that can be beneficial for the stakeholders ranging from the corporate to the individuals. The scheme has evolved over time and received strong response, said Dr Baqir urging participants to benefit from this facility.

He said that mobilisation of financial resources towards resource efficient and sustainable avenues would play a central role in mitigating climate change. Pakistan is member of Global Sustainable Banking Network (SBN) since 2015 and green and sustainable finance policies are being aligned with global environmental and social standards and best practice.

In his address, Chairman & CEO Unilever Pakistan Amir Paracha said FSRE offered tremendous social and business value to companies and producers both in terms of their environmental footprint and cost savings ambitions.

As part of this financing scheme, Unilever availed a loan of Rs833m through Standard Chartered Bank to set up 8.85MW of renewable energy production facilities across four factories in Punjab.

This effort is in line with Unilever’s global mission for carbon neutrality and sustainability in its manufacturing process. Unilever has committed to remove carbon emissions from operations by 2030, as well as net zero emissions from their products by 2039, which will be 11 years ahead of the 2050 Paris Agreement.

The webinar was attended by various chambers, media organisations, presidents and CEOs of banks, energy experts, representatives of Pakistan Business Council and senior officials from the SBP.
Riaz Haq said…
“Sales of solar power systems have gone up 80 per cent in the last two years owing to a soaring demand in rural areas where power availability is still a remote possibility,” said M. Saleem Memon, the vice-president of Karachi Electronics Dealers Association (KEDA).

https://www.dawn.com/news/1626781


Mr Memon, who also deals in alternative energy solutions, said sales of solar-powered systems are going on in urban areas but these cannot match the impressive demand in rural areas. He went on to add that in urban areas, residential and educational buildings, private offices and industries are shifting towards the alternative energy option, he said.

Claiming that the price of solar panel systems had been unchanged for the last two years, he said, 5kW and 10kW system (battery, inverter and panels) cost Rs500,000 and Rs1 million, followed by Rs100,000 and Rs200,000 for 1kW and 2kW, respectively.

In rural areas, he said solar energy is also being used to run tube wells and water pumps.

Talking to Dawn, Sikandar Shahzada, the owner of Sikandar and Co, said the boom in construction of highrise buildings, big government projects, vertical expansion in factories, etc has caused an alarming jump in import bill of power generating machines which need 20kVA to 100kVA generators.

A dealer in solar system and generators, Mr Shahzada said that in highrise projects, standby generators are a must to keep lifts moving coupled with ensuring power requirement for water pumping machines in case of power failures.

“People are fast moving towards solar power solutions since power rates and petrol/diesel prices have been going up for the last few years, while many buyers are unable to afford generators due to the rising cost of living,” he said. “Consumers are now well informed regarding affordable living choices and are opting for solar power systems whose sales are 100 per cent up compared to the last two years,” he claimed.

A 20kW solar system is considered feasible as many consumers after consuming low power transfer excess power to K-Electric under a deal for which a separate meter is installed, he explained.

The price of 20kW and 30kW solar systems is Rs1.85m and Rs2.8m, respectively, while the price of one kVA branded Chinese generator now costs Rs32,000 as against Rs26,000 some 10 months back, he said. A 2.5kVA power gadget costs Rs52,000-55,000, up by 15pc compared to price prevailing 10 months back, he added.

Mr Shahzada attributed the hike in generator prices to rising freight charges, global container shortages and soaring copper and steel prices which had offset the impact of low import cost on account of gaining rupee against the dollar in the last nine months.

In August 2020, one dollar was equivalent to Rs168.71 as compared to current inter-bank rate of Rs152-153.

Talking to Dawn, Pakistan Mach­inery Merchants Group (PMMG) President Khurram Saigal said household consumers and small and medium enterprises (SME) are reluctant to purchase generators due to a slowdown in loadshedding in the last few years. “High generator prices and consumer focus towards solar systems has hit sales of these machine. Sales to SMEs are down by 70pc in the last two years,” he claimed.

Popular posts from this blog

Turkish-Born Muslim Scientists Behind Pfizer's Successful COVID19 Vaccine

Karachi-born NED University Alum Leads Mercedes Entry into Electric Vehicles Market

Karachi's NED University Alum Raises $100 Million For Silicon Valley FinTech Startup